Carer feels trust gone under National Disability Insurance Scheme

David Smith with Michelle Durham, whom he cares for, at their home in Mayfield West.

David Smith with Michelle Durham, whom he cares for, at their home in Mayfield West.

ONE Mayfield West carer says he is fed up with the lack of trust he has received from the National Disability Insurance Agency.

The agency administers the National Disability Insurance Scheme, which was introduced on July 1, 2013, at four trial sites, including the Hunter.

David Smith, 60, has cared for 39-year-old Michelle Durham, who has an intellectual disability, full-time for 12 years.

Miss Durham also suffers from incontinence.

Before Miss Durham's transition to the scheme, Mr Smith received a $500 annual lump sum from Medicare under the Continence Aids Payment Scheme to buy continence products for Miss Durham.

This advance payment stopped under the scheme, with Mr Smith now required to produce receipts annually for the items before being reimbursed.

"Medicare trusted me; these people [the agency] don't," he said.

"The NDIS [scheme] has actually brought me more stress."

NDIS Hunter trial site manager Kim Birch said scheme participants who required continence products had this considered in their disability care plan.

"Participants can order [products] direct from a registered service provider . . . with no direct expenses incurred."

"For participants who choose to self-manage this item and related funding in their plan, they will pay a supplier direct and obtain a receipt in order to acquit their expenditure against their plan."

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