Newcastle Museum launches four-year World War I exhibition

Newcastle museum deputy director Julie Baird with the Dead Man’s Penny awarded to Ray Hobden’s family.

Newcastle museum deputy director Julie Baird with the Dead Man’s Penny awarded to Ray Hobden’s family.

Newcastle nurse Ida Greaves with an unknown officer.

Newcastle nurse Ida Greaves with an unknown officer.

PAYING tribute to our fallen servicemen, Newcastle Museum has launched a four-year exhibition to commemorate World War I, titled Shadows of Sacrifice.

The exhibition (which will run until November 11, 2018) will be updated every six months to reflect the changing events of 100 years ago.

The first exhibition will focus on the start of the war, when feelings of patriotism and heroism were high.

Museum deputy director Julie Baird said two local stories stood out to her, those of nurse Ida Greaves and Ray Hobden.

Mr Hobden was born in Waratah and enlisted in the 1st Light Horse Regiment within days of the outbreak of war.

"Ray signed up right at the beginning of the war when there was this noble idea floating around that the war was about having an adventure. But then reality struck. He landed in Gallipoli and was dead five days later," she said.

The Dead Man's Penny that was awarded to Mr Hobden's family is on display at the museum. Ten thousand Hunter men enlisted and at least 75 women served as nurses.

Among those nurses was Matron Ida Greaves, who qualified in nursing at Newcastle Hospital in 1904.

She volunteered with the Australian Voluntary Hospital at the outbreak of war and was one of the first Australians to serve in Europe.

She was awarded the British War Medal, the Victory Medal and the Royal Red Cross 1st Class for exceptional services in military nursing.

All of them can be seen at the exhibition, along with photographs and some of her personal belongings.

■ Shadows of Sacrifice: Newcastle's Great War 1914 - 1918 is on at Newcastle Museum.

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