Lord Mayor's Message | Art classes tackle illegal graffiti | Nuatali Nelmes

LOOKING GOOD: Deputy Lord Mayor Jason Dunn with four teens who completed a mural they had designed for a shed at Wallsend Park.

LOOKING GOOD: Deputy Lord Mayor Jason Dunn with four teens who completed a mural they had designed for a shed at Wallsend Park.

Newcastle City Council has teamed up with NSW Juvenile Justice to tackle illegal street graffiti by teaching youngsters new artistic skills and how to practise their art legitimately.

The Street Art Education Program (SAEP) teaches pupils how to design artworks, prepare surfaces to paint them on and select the right painting materials as part of a proactive initiative to reduce illegal street graffiti, which is removed at rate payers’ expense.

Deputy Lord Mayor Jason Dunn congratulated four teens last week as they completed a colourful mural they had designed for a shed at Wallsend Park.

This truly is a great initiative as removing graffiti cost council around $640,000 in the past year. The program will help us proactively tackle this issue and hopefully reduce those annual costs.

Councillor Dunn and I were both impressed with the mural the four painted at Wallsend and look forward to seeing more council buildings with a creative coat of paint applied by SAEP participants.

Newcastle City Council has a full-time graffiti and rapid response team that operates four vehicles equipped with high pressure washers and cleaning chemicals in a continuous fight against illegal graffiti.

Council provides ongoing grant funding to Juvenile Justice for graffiti removal and this year adopted a more proactive approach through the six-week SAEP. 

Nuatali Nelmes, Lord Mayor

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