Documentary Screenagers explores impact too much screen time is having on our teenagers

THOUGHT-PROVOKING: Delaney Ruston with daughter Tessa. Delaney Ruston is a doctor and filmmaker whose documentary Screenagers looks at teenagers and their overwhelming use of screen technology. Photo: Brook Mitchell

THOUGHT-PROVOKING: Delaney Ruston with daughter Tessa. Delaney Ruston is a doctor and filmmaker whose documentary Screenagers looks at teenagers and their overwhelming use of screen technology. Photo: Brook Mitchell

Becky Carver, of Creating Pathways, believes Screenagers is important viewing for parents and children in the community.

Ms Carver, a mother, psychotherapist and clinical hypnotherapist, is hosting a screening of the award-winning documentary on May 24 at Event Cinemas, Kotara.

It probes into the vulnerable corners of family life, including the director's own, and depicts messy struggles, over social media, video games, academics and internet addiction.

Through surprising insights from authors and brain scientists solutions emerge on how parents can empower kids to best navigate the digital world.

“It’s looking at the impact of social media and technology on our kids today, so even if you’ve got young kids, as a parent to build awareness around the effects that social media is having,” Carver said.

“We’re travelling in a new area in terms of parenting: how do you deal with this and how do we mange it. On the trailer, one of the main ladies to do with the film, is exploring how, as a community and a culture, do we manage to deal with this.

“I think it’s important that kids see it as well.”

Ms Carver said the effects of screen time on our youth was unchartered territory for society,

“It looks at the impact on the brain, the impact on socialisation, and also families,” Ms Carver said.

“In the trailer, there’s a brother and sister talking and the sister is saying how she really missed her brother because he was just always not present and how that also impacts the intrapersonal relationships in families and in schools.

Becky Carver

Becky Carver

“I think as parents, we tend to just want to ignore the problem and not do anything about it ... that’s why as a community it’s really important that we support each other as parents to address this issue.

“As parents I think it’s important that we band together so we’re on the same page.

“It’s something that I’m interested in and want to know more about and also want to be more active in the community around education as well.”

To find out more or to book a ticket for the screening, go to www.fan-force.com/screenings/screenagers-event-cinemas-kotara-nsw.

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