Games are family affair

THE doctors were quick to tell one Eleebana mum exactly what her daughter could not do when she was born.

While the physical and mental limitations of being born with Down syndrome were obvious, it made Gail Nay even more determined to make sure her daughter had the same opportunities as any other child.

From the age of two, Megan started swimming to help develop muscle tone and improve co-ordination.

According to her mother, Megan, now aged 10, could swim before she could walk.

With a clear talent and passion in freestyle and backstroke, it was no surprise to her mother and sister Melinda, 14, that Megan was chosen for the upcoming Special Olympics - Junior National Games.

"It will be a really great opportunity for Megan and all we want is for her to do the very best that she can," Melinda said.

"She is just like any other kid when she is out there in the pool. It is really nice to see," Ms Nay said.

A promising athlete in and out of the pool, Megan is modest about her achievements and said the thing about the games she loved most was meeting new people.

"I really like doing freestyle but I also like getting medals and being with my friends, too," she said.

The games in Newcastle will be a family affair for the Nays.

Melinda has volunteered to help the athletes in swimming and basketball events, saying supporting her sister in action was one of her favourite things.

"I love watching Megan excel in a non-judgmental environment," she said.

The games will be held from December 6 to 10.

Swimming will take place at The Forum Sports & Aquatic Centre, University of Newcastle, on Saturday, December 8.

BIGGEST FAN: Melinda Nay is volunteering at the Special Olympics – Junior national Games to help her sister Megan and other athletes

BIGGEST FAN: Melinda Nay is volunteering at the Special Olympics – Junior national Games to help her sister Megan and other athletes

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