Majority of NSW medics, nurses rate highly

A survey of NSW public hospital patients shows they rate their doctors and nurses very highly.
A survey of NSW public hospital patients shows they rate their doctors and nurses very highly.

A survey of more than 17,800 people admitted to one of NSW's 77 public hospitals in 2018 found that three-quarters of them rated their doctors and nurses in the highest possible bracket.

The survey of 17,805 people released by the state's Bureau of Health Information on Wednesday found 72 per cent rated their doctors as "very good", an increase from 69 per cent in 2017, while 76 per cent rated their nurses as "very good", up from 71 per cent.

Overall, 94 per cent of patients said they would rate the care they received as very good (67 per cent) or good (27 per cent).

The percentage of patients who rated their care in the most positive category was significantly lower than the state's average for those admitted to Liverpool, Bankstown-Lidcombe and Nepean hospitals.

A full 10 per cent less of patients who spoke a language other than English at home rated their care as very good (59 per cent) compared with those who spoke English at home (69 per cent).

Women were less likely to rate their experience as very good when compared with men with 65 per cent and 70 per cent respectively.

Of those with a postgraduate degree, 63 per cent rated their care as very good compared with 70 per cent of those with less than Year 12 education.

A survey conducted of 11,378 patients who attended one of 44 cancer clinics in November 2018 likewise found 99 per cent rated their care as very good (85 per cent) or good (14 per cent).

Of the group, 86 per cent rated their health professionals as very good while 13 per cent rated them as good.

In addition, 79 per cent of those questioned as part of the public hospital patient survey said they would speak highly of their care.

Some 81 per cent said health professionals always explained things in a way they could understand and 75 per cent said the nurses who provided treatment always knew enough about their care and treatment.

However, just 40 per cent said a health professional discussed their worries or fears with them completely and 49 per cent said the hospital always provided an interpreter when it was needed.

Only 61 per cent said if they needed to speak to a doctor they always got the opportunity to do so.

When it came to rating hospital food, just 20 per cent rated the food as very good with the Royal Hospital for Women receiving the lowest score in the state with 11 per cent.

Two-thirds of patients (66 per cent) who wanted to be involved in decisions about their discharge said they definitely felt involved, and 73 per cent of patients who needed information about how to manage their care at home said they were completely given enough information.

Australian Associated Press